Oral Hygiene

Welcoming Patients from Dubuque, Davenport, Dyersville, IA & Galena, IL

USA Weekends Beyond Brushing

“You know the drill: Brush at least twice a day with soft bristles, don’t forget to floss, and visit your dentist regularly for cleanings and exams. Good oral hygiene not only keeps your smile pearly-white and gums in good shape, but it could help the rest of you stay healthy, too: Research shows cardiovascular disease, diabetes and osteoporosis, among other conditions, may be linked to oral health. More tips to protect your teeth, based on the latest research.

Healthy Heart and Healthy Teeth

Heart disease is the leadingkiller of men and women in the United States and in Europe. British researchers studied nearly 12,000 adults in Scotland found that those who don’t brush their teeth twice a day have a 70% increased risk of heart disease compared to those who brush twice a day.

My gums bleed when I brush

It’s important to understand how your oral health impacts the overall health of your body.

When you have an infection in your mouth, your body, unfortunately, cannot remove the infection on its own – it requires intervention. Taking care of the bleeding and the infection as soon as possible is critical as it limits the time you’re exposing the rest of the body to an infection that has the potential of becoming much more serious.

Importance of Keeping Your Teeth an NPR Story

Earlier this month, National Public Radio featured the story “As Our Skin Sags with Age, So Do Our Bones.” One of the most important elements in keeping facial bone definition is to keep your natural teeth!
David Hunt, a physical anthropologist at the Smithsonian’s Natural History Museum in Washington, D.C., was interviewed for the story. He oversees the roughly 30,000 human skeletons in the Smithsonian’s collection.

Periodontal disease a risk marker for stroke

Men with a history of bone loss due to periodontal disease run a higher risk of having a stroke, according to a study in the Annals of Neurology (May 28, 2009). The researchers analyzed data from 1,137 men in the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study, an ongoing study that began in the 1960s with healthy volunteers from the Boston Area. Participants underwent medical and dental exams every three years for an average of 24 years.

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